Following the prophet is easy when all you need to do is agree

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A sacrament speaker brought up the November policy change today.

That marks yet another consecutive week of someone mentioning the policy change at least once during sacrament meeting, Sunday school, and elders quorum class.

I’ve beaten to death my feelings on the wordings and implications of the policy change, but as I was stewing on pondering the words of the speaker, a thought came to me that I hadn’t considered before, particularly connected with something the following speaker mentioned.

Why are Mormons so quick to stand firm behind the prophet when what he says requires no sacrifice?

In this case, I am definitely in the minority in my ward and stake regarding my feelings regarding this policy change. Most ward and stake members I know (and for that matter, Mormons I know outside of my stake) support the brethren on this change.

But it’s easy to support it. You don’t have to invest anything into supporting them. In fact, all you need to do is agree with them.

Let’s contrast this with home teaching.

Our high council speaker today reported that home teaching in our stake sits at 27%. That means that 3 out of every 4 families in our stake don’t receive visits from their home teachers. While anecdotal, friends of mine have shared similar statistics where they live.

So, back to my question: why are Mormons so quick to stand firm behind the prophet when what he says requires no sacrifice but so slow when what he says requires sacrifice?

Conversely, why am I labelled an apostate or a heretic when I disagree with the brethren on a policy (like the recent decision to prohibit children of gay parents from being baptized) but follow their counsel in other ways (like home teaching every month)?

Why are others not labelled apostate or heretics when they agree with the brethren on a policy (like the recent decision to prohibit children of gay parents from being baptized) but don’t follow their counsel in other ways (like home teaching every month)?

To be abundantly clear, I’m not judging those who don’t visit their home teaching families. I’m simply using that as an example. And it’s certainly not the only example we could use.

Finally, you know what the irony is in all this? Thomas S. Monson sat on the committee that established the current home teaching programme.

9 thoughts on “Following the prophet is easy when all you need to do is agree

  1. Interesting. The parable of the 10 virgins comes to mind.

    Both Home Teaching and the Policy change are, AS PRESENTED TO US by the leadership of the Church as well as in my own belief on the matter, were revelatory decisions made with direct guidance from God (whether or not you or anyone else believes this is up to you).

    We are commanded to follow the Prophet. The onus of our salvation and exaltation is predicated upon our obedience to God, by following the path He has told us to follow.

    Anyone who is failing to meet the requirements as set before them need to change. . . this happens to be all of us in one form or another.

    1. Interesting! The church’s essay on “Race and the Priesthood” come to mind…especially the part about President Brigham Young publicly announcing that men of black African descent could no longer be ordained to the priesthood.

  2. Matthew 21:28-32
    28 ¶But what think ye? A certain man had two sons; and he came to the first, and said, Son, go work to day in my vineyard.

    29 He answered and said, I will not: but afterward he repented, and went.

    30 And he came to the second, and said likewise. And he answered and said, I go, sir: and went not.

    31 Whether of them twain did the will of his father? They say unto him, The first. Jesus saith unto them, Verily I say unto you, That the publicans and the harlots go into the kingdom of God before you.

    32 For John came unto you in the way of righteousness, and ye believed him not: but the publicans and the harlots believed him: and ye, when ye had seen it, repented not afterward, that ye might believe him.

  3. You say… “That marks yet another consecutive week of someone mentioning the policy change at least once during sacrament meeting, Sunday school, and elders quorum class.”

    You live in the heart of Mormon Country. My experience in the fringes, geographically removed from large Mormon centre, has been the policy change has not been referred to much. It was the content of one testimony in my ward but the testimony related to grieving for how this policy will affect those they knew and loved. They did not disagree with the policy but mourned for ways they knew it would impact loved ones. They expressed faith in being led by a prophet despite not fully understanding the decision.

  4. Elder Uchtdorf also said at the last conference that we shouldn’t seek truth on the Internet…..do we take that literally?

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